Bundle of Dried Blue Lavender Bouquets, 100-120 Stem Per Bouquet, High Quality, Natural, Organic, Biodegraddable, Wedding, Craft
Bundle of Dried Blue Lavender Bouquets, 100-120 Stem Per Bouquet, High Quality, Natural, Organic, Biodegraddable, Wedding, Craft
Bundle of Dried Blue Lavender Bouquets, 100-120 Stem Per Bouquet, High Quality, Natural, Organic, Biodegraddable, Wedding, Craft
Bundle of Dried Blue Lavender Bouquets, 100-120 Stem Per Bouquet, High Quality, Natural, Organic, Biodegraddable, Wedding, Craft
Bundle of Dried Blue Lavender Bouquets, 100-120 Stem Per Bouquet, High Quality, Natural, Organic, Biodegraddable, Wedding, Craft
Bundle of Dried Blue Lavender Bouquets, 100-120 Stem Per Bouquet, High Quality, Natural, Organic, Biodegraddable, Wedding, Craft
Bundle of Dried Blue Lavender Bouquets, 100-120 Stem Per Bouquet, High Quality, Natural, Organic, Biodegraddable, Wedding, Craft
Bundle of Dried Blue Lavender Bouquets, 100-120 Stem Per Bouquet, High Quality, Natural, Organic, Biodegraddable, Wedding, Craft
Bundle of Dried Blue Lavender Bouquets, 100-120 Stem Per Bouquet, High Quality, Natural, Organic, Biodegraddable, Wedding, Craft
Bundle of Dried Blue Lavender Bouquets, 100-120 Stem Per Bouquet, High Quality, Natural, Organic, Biodegraddable, Wedding, Craft

Bundle of Dried Blue Lavender Bouquets, 100-120 Stem Per Bouquet, High Quality, Natural, Organic, Biodegraddable, Wedding, Craft

Regular price $36.94
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We are gladly presenting to you these organic-grown flowers from our homestead!
All bouquets have 100-120 stems and are air-dired.
Description:
Lavandula (common name lavender) is a genus of 47 known species of flowering plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae. It is native to the Old World and is found from Cape Verde and the Canary Islands, Europe across to northern and eastern Africa, the Mediterranean, southwest Asia to southeast India. Many members of the genus are cultivated extensively in temperate climates as ornamental plants for garden and landscape use, for use as culinary herbs, and also commercially for the extraction of essential oils. The most widely cultivated species, Lavandula angustifolia, is often referred to as lavender, and there is a color named for the shade of the flowers of this species.
Usage:
Potpourri, all of baked goods and all other types of food(these are edible flowers so feel free to tast them), tea making.
Use of the buds
For most cooking applications the dried buds, which are also referred to as flowers, are used. Lavender greens have a more subtle flavour when compared to rosemary.
The potency of the lavender flowers increases with drying which makes their use more sparingly to avoid a heavy, soapy aftertaste. Chefs note to reduce by 2/3rds the dry amount in recipes which call for fresh lavender buds.
Lavender buds can amplify both sweet and savory flavors in dishes, and is sometimes paired with sheep's-milk and goat's-milk cheeses. Lavender flowers are occasionally blended with black, green, or herbal teas. Lavender flavours baked goods and desserts, pairing especially well with chocolate. In the United States, both lavender syrup and dried lavender buds are used to make lavender scones and marshmallows.
Lavender buds are put into sugar for two weeks to allow the essential oils and fragrance to transfer; then the sugar itself is used in baking. Lavender can be used in breads where recipes call for rosemary. Lavender can be used decoratively in dishes or spirits, or as a decorative and aromatic in a glass of champagne. Lavender is used in savory dishes, giving stews and reduced sauces aromatic flair. It is also used to scent flans, custards, and sorbets.
Use of the greens
The greens are used similarly to rosemary or combined with rosemary to flavour meat and vegetables in savory dishes. They can also be used to make a tea that is milder than teas made with the flowers.
In honey
The flowers yield abundant nectar, from which bees make a high-quality honey. Monofloral honey is produced primarily around the Mediterranean, and is marketed worldwide as a premium product. Flowers can be candied and are sometimes used as cake decorations. It is also used to make "lavender sugar."
Culinary history
Lavender was introduced into England in the 1600s. It is said that Queen Elizabeth prized a lavender conserve (jam) at her table, so lavender was produced as a jam at that time, as well as used in teas both medicinally and for its taste.
Lavender was not used in traditional southern French cooking at the turn of the 20th century. It does not appear at all in the best-known compendium of Provençal cooking, J.-B. Reboul's Cuisinière Provençale. French lambs have been allowed to graze on lavender as it is alleged to make their meat more tender and fragrant.
In the 1970s, a blend of herbs called herbes de Provence was invented by spice wholesalers, where culinary lavender is added to the mixture in the North American version of the spice blend.
Today, lavender recipes are in use in most parts of the world.
Flower spikes are used for dried flower arrangements. The fragrant, pale purple flowers and flower buds are used in potpourris. Lavender is also used extensively as herbal filler inside sachets used to freshen linens. Dried and sealed in pouches, lavender flowers are placed among stored items of clothing to give a fresh fragrance and to deter moths. Dried lavender flowers have become recently popular for wedding confetti. Lavender is also popular in scented waters and sachets.
The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) states that lavender is considered likely safe in food amounts and possibly safe in medicinal amounts. NIH does not recommend the use of lavender while pregnant or breast-feeding because of lack of knowledge of its effects. It recommends caution if young boys use lavender oil because of possible hormonal effects leading to gynecomastia, and states that lavender may cause skin irritation and could be poisonous if consumed by mouth.
A 2005 review on lavender essential oil stated that "Lavender is traditionally regarded as a 'safe' oil and, although it was recently reported that lavender oil, and its major constituent linalyl acetate, are toxic to human skin cells in vitro, contact dermatitis to lavender oil appears to occur at only a very low frequency."
Lavender greens can be used in craft or modelling projects, such as the creation of miniature topiary or trees.
Please note, that these are air-dried flowers and there may be some variations of color and shape(color can be more or less intense due to difference of weather conditions).